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Practice Name

Shreveport Eye Clinic

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Primary Location
471 Ashley Ridge Blvd #300
Shreveport, LA 71106
Phone: (318) 861-4009
Fax: 3188614080

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00AM5:00PM
Tuesday8:00AM5:00PM
Wednesday8:00AM5:00PM
Thursday8:00AM5:00PM
Friday8:00AM5:00PM
SaturdayClosedClosed
SundayClosedClosed
Main Content

Eye Anatomy

The human eye works much like a movie camera. It receives light from objects that it focuses and projects onto a sensitive screen, and then converts the images into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain via the optic nerve.

The human eye works much like a movie camera. It receives light from objects that it focuses and projects onto a sensitive screen, and then converts the images into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain via the optic nerve. On the surface of your eye, the transparent cornea covers the colored iris and the nearly black pupil. The pupil controls light entering the eye. It dilates in low light conditions, thereby allowing more light to enter the eye. In bright conditions, it contracts to limit the amount of light let in.

The space between the cornea and lens is filled with a fluid called aqueous humor, which provides nourishment for the cornea and lens and keeps the eyeball round and firm. Just behind the iris and pupil is the crystalline lens, which converges light rays to focus on the retina. The shape of this elastic lens changes with the contractions and relaxations of muscles in the eye. The large chamber behind the lens is filled with a fluid known as vitreous humor. At the back of the eye is a thin membrane called the retina, which contains rods used primarily for nighttime vision and cones used for daylight vision. When light reaches the rod or cone cells, it causes a chemical change in light-sensitive pigments found within the cells. The chemical change results in an electrical impulse that is transmitted to nerve cells that branch into many fibers to form the optic nerve. The impulse is carried from the optic nerve to the visual centers of the brain where we perceive the image.

Focusing

Near-sightedness vs. Far-sightnedness

When the eye views distant objects, the crystalline lens becomes flat as it is pulled by the suspensory ligaments. When viewing closer objects, the ciliary muscle contracts, reducing the pull of the suspensory fibers and allowing the lens to bulge at the center. The rounder lens has a stronger focusing power, allowing objects to come into sharp focus on the retina. This increased focusing power necessary for near vision is known as accommodation. As we grow older, accommodation is gradually lost as the lens begins to harden. By age 40, a person may require eyeglasses for reading and other close-up work.

Services We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about all the services we provide. Make An Appointment We will do our best to accommodate your busy schedule. Schedule an appointment today! Online Forms Our patient forms are available online so they can be completed in the convenience of your own home or office.

Testimonials

"This is a fantastic clinic! The staff is very warm and welcoming. I always feel relaxed there."

Karen P., Shreveport

Office Hours

DayMorningAfternoon
Monday8:00AM5:00PM
Tuesday8:00AM5:00PM
Wednesday8:00AM5:00PM
Thursday8:00AM5:00PM
Friday8:00AM5:00PM
SaturdayClosedClosed
SundayClosedClosed
Day Morning Afternoon
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
8:00AM 8:00AM 8:00AM 8:00AM 8:00AM Closed Closed
5:00PM 5:00PM 5:00PM 5:00PM 5:00PM Closed Closed

Our Services

We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about all the services we provide.

Read More

Contact

  • 471 Ashley Ridge Blvd #300 Shreveport, LA 71106
  • (318) 861-4009

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